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José M. Olano
Noelia, González-Muñoz
Alberto, Arzac
Vicente, Rozas
Georg, Von Arx
Sylvain, Delzon
Ana I. García-Cervigón
2018-02-07T07:27:02Z
2018-02-07T07:27:02Z
2017-06
José M. Olano. Sex determines xylem anatomy in a dioecious conifer: hydraulic consequences in a drier world [Текст] / José M. Olano, González-Muñoz Noelia, Arzac Alberto, Rozas Vicente, Von Arx Georg, Delzon Sylvain, Ana I. García-Cervigón // Tree Physiology. — 2017. — Т. 1. — С. 1-10
0829318X
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28575521
http://elib.sfu-kras.ru/handle/2311/69689
Текст статьи не публикуется в открытом доступе в соответствии с политикой журнала.
Increased drought frequency and severity may reshape tree species distribution in arid environments. Dioecious tree species may be more sensitive to climate warming if sex-related vulnerability to drought occurs, since lower performance of one sex may drive differential stress tolerance, sex-related mortality rates and biased sex ratios. We explored the effect of sex and environment on branch hydraulic (hydraulic conductivity and vulnerability to embolism) and trunk anatomical traits in both sexes of the dioecious conifer Juniperus thurifera L. at two sites with contrasting water availability. Additionally, we tested for a trade-off between hydraulic safety (vulnerability to embolism) and efficiency (hydraulic conductivity). Vulnerability to embolism and hydraulic conductivity were unaffected by sex or site at branch level. In contrast, sex played a significant role in xylem anatomy. We found a trade-off between hydraulic safety and efficiency, with larger conductivities related to higher vulnerabilities to embolism. At the anatomical level, females’ trunk showed xylem anatomical traits related to greater hydraulic efficiency (higher theoretical hydraulic conductivity) over safety (thinner tracheid walls, lower Mork’s Index), whereas males’ trunk anatomy followed a more conservative strategy, especially in the drier site. Reconciling the discrepancy between branch hydraulic function and trunk xylem anatomy would require a thorough and integrated understanding of the tree structure–function relationship at the whole-plant level. Nevertheless, lower construction costs and higher efficiency in females’ xylem anatomy at trunk level might explain the previously observed higher growth rates in mesic habitats. However, prioritizing efficiency over safety in trunk construction might make females more sensitive to drought, endangering the species’ persistence in a drier world.
dioecy
drought
hydraulic efficiency
hydraulic safety
Juniperus thurifera
xylem anatomy
Sex determines xylem anatomy in a dioecious conifer: hydraulic consequences in a drier world
Journal Article
Published Journal Article
1-10
34.35.15
2018-02-07T07:27:02Z
10.1093/treephys/tpx066
Институт экологии и географии
Laboratory of Biogeochemestry of Ecosystems
Tree Physiology
Q1
Q1


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